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Final facts and figures

Published: Friday 9 March 2007, 1.39CET
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Published: Friday 9 March 2007, 1.39CET

Final facts and figures

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Most European Champion Clubs' Cup wins: by club
9 Real Madrid CF (1955/56, 1956/57, 1957/58, 1958/59, 1959/60, 1965/66, 1997/98, 1999/00, 2001/02)
6 AC Milan (1962/63, 1968/69, 1988/89, 1989/90, 1993/94, 2002/03)
5 Liverpool FC (1976/77, 1977/78, 1980/81, 1983/84, 2004/05)
4 AFC Ajax (1970/71, 1971/72, 1972/73, 1994/95)
4 FC Bayern München (1973/74, 1974/75, 1975/76, 2000/01)

Most European Champion Clubs' Cup wins: by player
6 Francisco Gento (Real Madrid CF - 1955/56, 1956/57, 1957/58, 1958/59, 1959/60, 1965/66)
5 Alfredo Di Stéfano (Real Madrid CF - 1955/56, 1956/57, 1957/58, 1958/59, 1959/60)
5 Marquitos (Real Madrid CF - 1955/56, 1956/57, 1957/58, 1958/59, 1959/60)
5 José María Zárraga (Real Madrid CF - 1955/56, 1956/57, 1957/58, 1958/59, 1959/60)
5 José Héctor Rial (Real Madrid CF - 1955/56, 1956/57, 1957/58, 1958/59, 1959/60)
5 Rafael Lesmes (Real Madrid CF - 1955/56, 1956/57, 1957/58, 1958/59, 1959/60)
(NOTE: Marquitos and Rial played in four finals, while Lesmes played in three but all were members of five winning squads)

Most European Champion Clubs' Cup wins: by coach
3 Bob Paisley (Liverpool FC - 1976/77, 1977/78, 1980/81)
2 Luis Antonio Carniglia (Real Madrid CF - 1957/58, 1958/59)
2 Brian Clough (Nottingham Forest FC - 1978/79, 1979/80)
2 Dettmar Cramer (FC Bayern München - 1974/75, 1975/76)
2 Vicente Del Bosque (Real Madrid CF - 1999/2000, 2001/02)
2 Béla Guttmann (SL Benfica - 1960/61, 1961/62)
2 Ernst Happel (Feyenoord - 1969/70, Hamburger SV - 1982/83)
2 Helenio Herrera (FC Internazionale Milano - 1963/64, 1964/65)
2 Ottmar Hitzfeld (BV Borussia Dortmund - 1996/97, FC Bayern München - 2000/01)
2 Stefan Kovács (AFC Ajax - 1971/72, 1972/73)
2 Miguel Muñoz (Real Madrid CF - 1959/60, 1965/66)
2 Nereo Rocco (AC Milan - 1962/63, 1968/69)
2 Arrigo Saachi (AC Milan - 1988/89, 1989/90)
2 José Villalonga (Real Madrid CF - 1955/56, 1956/57)

European Champion Clubs' Cup wins: as both player and coach
4 Johan Cruyff (AFC Ajax - 1970/71, 1971/72, 1972/73, FC Barcelona - 1991/92*)
4 Miguel Muñoz (Real Madrid CF - 1955/56, 1956/57, Real Madrid CF - 1959/60*, 1965/66*)
4 Frank Rijkaard (AC Milan - 1988/89, 1989/90, AFC Ajax - 1994/95, FC Barcelona - 2005/06*)
3 Carlo Ancelotti (AC Milan - 1988/89, 1989/90, AC Milan - 2002/03*)
3 Giovanni Trapattoni (AC Milan - 1962/63, 1968/69, Juventus - 1984/85*)

*as coach

European Champion Clubs' Cup wins: by player with different clubs
3 Clarence Seedorf (AFC Ajax - 1994/95, Real Madrid CF - 1997/98, AC Milan - 2002/03)
2 Miodrag Belodedici (CSA Steaua Bucuresti - 1985/86, FK Crvena Zvezda - 1990/91)
2 Marcel Desailly (Olympique de Marseille - 1992/93, AC Milan - 1993/94)
2 Didier Deschamps (Olympique de Marseille - 1992/93, Juventus - 1995/96)
2 Vladimir Jugović (FK Crvena Zvezda - 1990/91, Juventus - 1995/96)
2 Ronald Koeman (PSV Eindhoven - 1987/88, FC Barcelona - 1991/92)
2 Saul Malatrasi (FC Internazionale Milano - 1964/65, AC Milan - 1968/69)
2 Christian Panucci (AC Milan - 1993/94, Real Madrid CF - 1997/98)
2 Fernando Redondo (Real Madrid CF - 1997/98, 1999/2000, AC Milan - 2002/03)
2 Frank Rijkaard (AC Milan - 1988/89, 1989/90, AFC Ajax - 1994/95)
2 Dejan Savićević (FK Crvena Zvezda - 1990/91, AC Milan - 1993/94)
2 Paulo Sousa (Juventus - 1995/96, BV Borussia Dortmund - 1996/97)
(NOTE: Malatrasi and Redondo were members of two and three winning squads respectively)

Most European Champion Clubs' Cup wins: by country
11 Spain (9 - Real Madrid CF, 2 - FC Barcelona)
10 England (5 - Liverpool FC, 2 - Manchester United FC, 2 - Nottingham Forest FC, 1 - Aston Villa FC)
10 Italy (6 - AC Milan, 2 - FC Internazionale Milano, 2 - Juventus)
6 Netherlands (4 - AFC Ajax, 1 - Feyenoord, 1 - PSV Eindhoven)
6 Germany (4 - FC Bayern München, 1 - BV Borussia Dortmund, 1 - Hamburger SV)

Most European Champion Clubs' Cup final goals: by player
7 Alfredo Di Stéfano (Real Madrid CF - 1955/56: 1, 1956/57: 1, 1957/58: 1, 1958/59: 1, 1959/60: 3)
7 Ferenc Puskás (Real Madrid CF - 1959/60: 4, 1961/62: 3)

Fastest goal
Just 52 seconds were on the clock when AC Milan defender Paolo Maldini hit a right-footed volley from Andrea Pirlo's free-kick past Jerzy Dudek in the Liverpool FC goal in the 2004/05 final.

Final hat-tricks
Ferenc Puskás (46, 56, 60, 71) and Alfredo Di Stéfano (27, 30, 73) helped themselves to all of Real Madrid CF's seven goals in their 7-3 defeat of TuSG Eintracht Frankfurt in the 1959/60 final at Glasgow's Hampden Park. Puskás (18, 23, 39) then scored a hat-trick in the 1961/62 final, but ended on the losing side as SL Benfica stunned Real Madrid 5-3 at Amsterdam's Olympisch stadium. The only other hat-trick came in the 1968/69 final when goals from Piero Prati (8, 40, 75) helped AC Milan to a 4-1 defeat of AFC Ajax at Madrid's Santiago Bernabéu stadium.

Widest margin of victory
Four-goal victors have happened on four occasions involving AC Milan (twice), Real Madrid CF and FC Bayern München. Real Madrid won the 1959/60 final 7-3 against TuSG Eintracht Frankfurt, while Bayern's 4-0 defeat of Club Atlético de Madrid came in the 1973/74 final replay after the two sides had earlier shared a 1-1 draw after extra time.

More recently, Milan have recorded two 4-0 successes, firstly against CSA Steaua Bucuresti in the 1988/89 final and then five years later against FC Barcelona. The latter victory, which took place at Athens' Spyros Louis stadium is also the widest margin of victory in a final. On that day, Daniele Massaro (22, 45), Dejan Savićević (47) and Marcel Desailly (58) provided the goals for Fabio Capello's side.

All-time records: UEFA Champions League (1992/93-to date)

By the numbers...

Oldest player to play in a final: 38
Alessandro Costacurta was an unused substitute for AC Milan in the 2004/05 final defeat by Liverpool FC, aged 39 years and 31 days. The veteran defender failed to become the oldest player to play in a final, a record held by Lothar Matthäus at 38 years and 66 days when he appeared for FC Bayern München in their 2-1 defeat at the hands of Manchester United FC in the 1998/99 final.

Oldest player to score in a final: 36
Paolo Maldini's right-footed volley 52 seconds into the 2004/05 final for AC Milan against Liverpool FC made him the oldest player to score at the age of 36 and 332 days. Despite being the record holder in terms of appearances in UEFA club competition, the goal was only Maldini's second in the European Cup, his other coming on 21 October 1992 in the second round of the competition away to ŠK Slovan Bratislava.

Until then, Teddy Sheringham (33 years and 53 days) held the record for his equaliser in the 1998/99 final as Manchester United FC staged a dramatic last-gasp comeback to defeat FC Bayern München, 2-1.

Youngest player to play in a final: 18
Three 18-year-olds have played in the European Cup final since the 1992/93 season, namely Patrick Kluivert, Nwankwo Kanu and Kiki Musampa. Kanu set the record when introduced as a 53rd-minute substitute in the 1994/95 final for AFC Ajax against AC Milan, with 18 years and 296 days. Kluivert then followed Kanu on to the field of play 17 minutes later with 18 years and 327 days to become the youngest player to score in a final with the only goal of the game six minutes from time.

Twelve months later, Musampa became the youngest player at 18 years and 305 days to start a final as Ajax lost on penalties to Juventus. In that match, Musampa was withdrawn at half-time to be replaced by Kluivert.

Finals: 14
Since the introduction of the UEFA Champions League, there have been 14 European Champion Clubs' Cup finals:
1992/93: Olympique de Marseille 1-0 AC Milan (Olympiastadion, Munich - 64,400 - Kurt Röthlisberger (SUI))
1993/94: AC Milan 4-0 FC Barcelona (Spyros Louis stadium, Athens - 70,000 - Philip Don (ENG))
1994/95: AFC Ajax 1-0 AC Milan (Ernst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna - 48,000 - Ion Craciunescu (ROM))
1995/96: AFC Ajax 1-1 Juventus FC (after extra time, Juventus won 4-2 on penalties - Stadio Olimpico, Rome - 67,000 - Manuel Diaz Vega (ESP))
1996/97: BV Borussia Dortmund 3-1 Juventus FC (Olympiastadion, Munich - 59,000 - Sándor Puhl (HUN))
1997/98: Juventus FC 0-1 Real Madrid CF (Amsterdam ArenA, Amsterdam - 48,500 - Helmut Krug (GER))
1998/99: Manchester United FC 2-1 FC Bayern München (Camp Nou, Barcelona - 90,245 - Pierluigi Collina (ITA))
1999/00: Real Madrid CF 3-0 Valencia CF (Stade de France, Paris - 80,000 - Stefano Braschi (ITA))
2000/01: FC Bayern München 1-1 Valencia CF (after extra time, Bayern won 5-4 on penalties - Giuseppe Meazza stadium, Milan - 79,000 - Dick Jol (NED))
2001/02: Bayer 04 Leverkusen 1-2 Real Madrid CF (Hampden Park, Glasgow - 50,499 - Urs Meier (SUI))
2002/03: Juventus 0-0 AC Milan (after extra time, Milan won 3-2 on penalties - Old Trafford, Manchester - 63,300 - Markus Merk (GER))
2003/04: AS Monaco FC 0-3 FC Porto (Arena AufSchalke, Gelsenkirchen - 53,053 - Kim Milton Nielsen (DEN))
2004/05: AC Milan 3-3 Liverpool FC (after extra time, Liverpool won 3-2 on penalties - Atatürk Olimpiyat stadium, Istanbul - 69,600 - Manuel Mejuto (ESP))
2005/06: FC Barcelona 2-1 Arsenal FC (Stade de France, Paris - 80,000 - Terje Hauge (NOR))

First-goal winners: 9
Nine teams that have scored first in the 14 finals have ended up as winners of the competition. The exceptions are FC Bayern München (1998/99), Valencia CF (2000/01), AC Milan (2004/05) and Arsenal FC (2005/06). The other final between Juventus and AC Milan at the end of the 2002/03 season was goalless.

Highest total of goals: 6
The 2004/05 final served up the highest amount of goals with six. Paolo Maldini (1) and Hernán Crespo (39, 44) gave AC Milan a three-goal interval lead only for Liverpool FC to respond in the second half through Steven Gerrard (53), Vladimir Šmicer (56) and Xabi Alonso (60). The match had no further goals through two periods of extra time until Liverpool won the competition via a penalty shootout.

Man of the match awards: 5
2000/01: Oliver Kahn (FC Bayern München)
2001/02: Zinédine Zidane (Real Madrid CF)
2002/03: Paolo Maldini (AC Milan)
2003/04: Deco (FC Porto)
2004/05: Steven Gerrard (Liverpool FC)
2005/06: Samuel Eto'o (FC Barcelona)

Most goals by a team: 4
AC Milan scored four in their defeat of FC Barcelona in the 1993/94 final with goals from Daniele Massaro (22, 45), Dejan Savićević (47) and Marcel Desailly (58).

Widest margin of victory: 4
Milan's four-goal haul in that match also provides the widest margin of victory in a final.

Penalty shoot-out winners: 4
Four finals have required a penalty shoot-out to determine the winner. Most recently, Liverpool FC (3-2) triumphed against AC Milan in the 2004/05 final, while Juventus FC (4-2) defeated AFC Ajax in 1995/96, FC Bayern München (5-4) beat Valencia CF in 2000/01 and Milan (3-2) were victorious against Juve in 2002/03.

Penalties scored in a final: 2
The two goals scored in the 2000/01 final came from the penalty spot. Dutch referee Dick Jol first pointed to the spot after two minutes as Gaizka Mendieta put Valencia CF before Stefan Effenberg equalised for FC Bayern München five minutes into the second half. Eventually, the match was decided on penalties with Bayern winning 5-4.

Most goals in a final (player): 2
Daniele Massaro (22, 45) scored twice for AC Milan in their 4-0 defeat of FC Barcelona in the 1993/94 final. Three years later, Karlheinz Riedle (29, 34) scored twice in BV Borussia Dortmund's 3-1 defeat of Juventus FC. In both matches, the two players provided the first two goals in their respective finals. In the 2004/05 final, Hernán Crespo (39, 44) scored twice for Milan, but he ended on the losing side as Liverpool FC recovered from a three-goal interval deficit to eventually win the match on penalties.

Fastest goal: 1
Just 52 seconds were on the clock when AC Milan defender Paolo Maldini hit a right-footed volley from Andrea Pirlo's free-kick past Jerzy Dudek in the Liverpool FC goal as the 2004/05 final got off to a flyer. Milan would be three goals ahead by the interval, but Liverpool fought back to force extra time before the English side won the competition on penalties.

Finals on 23 May: 2
Two other European Cup finals have fallen on 23 May. Thehe first came in 1990 when AC Milan took on SL Benfica at Austria's Ernst-Happel-Stadion and won 1-0 in front of 57,500 fans with a 67th-minute Frank Rijkaard goal to retain the trophy. Exactly eleven years on, Milan was the venue for a final at the Stadio Giuseppe Meazza between FC Bayern München and Valencia CF. The 79,000 crowd had barely settled when Gaizka Mendieta converted a penalty for Valencia in the second minute, and on six minutes Santiago Cañizares saved a spot-kick from Mehmet Scholl. Bayern eventually equalised - from the spot - on 50 minutes through Steffen Effenberg and they went on to win 5-4 in the shoot-out, Oliver Kahn saving the decisive kick by Mauricio Pellegrino.

Lowest total of goals: 0
Only one final has ended goalless after 120 minutes, that came in the 2002/03 showpiece when AC Milan and Juventus met in Manchester. Milan eventually won the competition following a 3-2 penalty shoot-out success.

Red cards: 1
Goalkeeper Jens Lehmann became the first player to be sent off in a final in 2005/06 when he was dismissed for a professional foul on Samuel Eto'o 18 minutes into Arsenal FC's 2-1 defeat by FC Barcelona with the game goalless.

Own goals in a final: 0
No own goals have been credited to a player. This is also the case throughout the history of the European Cup.

Extra-time victors: 0
Although four finals since 1992/93 have featured extra time, not one has been decided during the two periods of 15 minutes. The last time it happened in the entire history of European Cup finals was in 1991/92 when FC Barcelona's Ronald Koeman scored after 112 minutes in a 1-0 defeat of UC Sampdoria.

Last updated: 03/03/07 15.06CET

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