Snap shot: Trezeguet sets up Juve for Madrid win

Juventus have fond memories of semi-finals against Real Madrid CF, but it could have been different without this moment from 2003. UEFA.com looks at the protagonists.

©UEFA.com

David Trezeguet slotted in moments before half-time at the Santiago Bernabéu to restore parity just as Juventus's 2002/03 UEFA Champions League semi-final threatened to run away from them. Ronaldo had given Real Madrid CF a deserved lead, with subsequent bookings for Mark Iuliano and Ciro Ferarra leaving the Italian title holders depleted for the return.

However, Trezeguet renewed Juve hope on the cusp of the interval, and though Roberto Carlos earned Madrid victory on the night, another Trezeguet goal 12 minutes into the second leg put the Bianconeri ahead on away goals. Further efforts from Alessandro Del Piero and Pavel Nedvěd made Zinédine Zidane's late reply immaterial as the Turin team claimed a famous triumph.

1. Gianluca Zambrotta
The left-back ended a seven-season stint at Juventus after winning the FIFA World Cup in 2006 when he moved to FC Barcelona, yet he was back in Italy within two years, signing for AC Milan. Honorary president of home-town side Calcio Como 1907, the man capped 98 times by Italy joined FC Chiasso in the Swiss second division in 2013, switching to coaching mid-season and leading them to safety. Last month, however, he left the club.

2. Antonio Conte
The combative midfielder was approaching 34 when Juve reached the 2003 UEFA Champions League final, hanging up his boots 12 months later. He made 418 appearances for the Old Lady across 13 seasons, having landed from home-town outfit US Lecce. He returned to Turin as coach in 2011 after guiding both AS Bari and AC Siena to Serie A. He adopted a team who had finished seventh the two previous campaigns; they won the Scudetto without losing a game in his first term in charge. He eventually claimed three Serie A titles in a row before taking the Italy job.

Five great David Trezeguet goals
Five great David Trezeguet goals

3. David Trezeguet
The striker plundered 171 goals in ten seasons with the Bianconeri from 2000 onwards, more than any other non-Italian has managed for the club. Born in France to Argentinian player Jorge Trezeguet, he grew up in Buenos Aires and made his top-flight debut aged 16, earning a transfer to AS Monaco FC. He lifted two Ligue 1 titles and was part of France's 1998 World Cup-winning squad before hitting the golden-goal winner in the UEFA EURO 2000 final. Trezeguet wound down his career in Spain, the United Arab Emirates, Argentina and India, retiring in January.

4. Iker Casillas
Casillas made his Madrid bow at 16 and won the UEFA Champions League four days after his 19th birthday quickly making up for his failure as a youngster to post his father's pools predictions, missing out on an estimated €1.2m. By 2003, when this photo was taken, he was a veteran of 21 and had added the first of five Liga crowns. He captained Spain to their historic UEFA EURO 2008, 2010 World Cup, UEFA EURO 2012 treble and has now amassed over 160 Spain caps and 720 matches for Madrid. Between the posts at the other end in 2003? Gianluigi Buffon.

Zinédine Zidane's final volley in 2002
Zinédine Zidane's final volley in 2002

5. Iván Helguera
Helguera was 24 when he landed in Madrid from RCD Espanyol in 1999. The defender-cum-midfielder stayed at the Bernabéu for eight years, making 346 outings despite the club's 'Galácticos' policy. He started both the 2000 and 2002 UEFA Champions League finals and collected three Liga titles. Helguera also compiled 47 caps for Spain, figuring at UEFA EURO 2000, UEFA EURO 2004 and the 2002 World Cup. He aided Valencia CF to Copa del Rey glory in 2008, playing his last game later that year, aged 33. He is now doing his coaching badges, runs a real estate business and is a regular guest on the radio.

6. Roberto Carlos
He of the vicious left foot, Brazil wing-back Roberto Carlos featured more than 500 times for the Merengues. He departed the Bernabéu in 2007 and had stints of varying success in Turkey (Fenerbahçe SK), Brazil (SC Corinthians Paulista) and Russia (FC Anji Makhachkala) before turning his hand to coaching. This began with an ill-fated few months at Anji, yet he fared better at Sivasspor and now bosses another Turkish top-flight side Akhisar Belediyespor.

Snap shot: Chelsea's 2005 title winners a decade on
Snap shot: When Benfica beat Mourinho's Porto
Snap shot: When Monaco stunned mighty Madrid

Snap shot: Barcelona silence Madrid at the Bernabéu
Snap shot: Ronaldo's Old Trafford standing ovation
Snap shot: Liverpool's Istanbul heroes

Snap shot: Juve snatch last-eight spot from Werder

Snap shot: Batistuta ends Roma's long title wait
Snap shot: When Ajax overcame 3-1 loss
Snap shot: Italy survive to reach World Cup final
Snap shot: Maradona's Napoli reign supreme, 1989
Snap shot: When Paris beat Barcelona's dream team

Top