UEFA rules against vuvuzela use

UEFA has decided that vuvuzelas – the trumpets that came to prominence during the 2010 FIFA World Cup – may not be brought into stadiums at UEFA competition matches.

Supporters blowing vuvuzelas during the World Cup
Supporters blowing vuvuzelas during the World Cup ©Getty Images

UEFA has decided that vuvuzelas – the trumpets that came to prominence at games during this summer's FIFA World Cup in South Africa – may not be brought into stadiums at matches in UEFA competitions.

European football's governing body has informed its 53 member associations that it has taken the move for reasons related to Europe's football culture and tradition, saying that the atmosphere at matches would be changed by the sound of the vuvuzela.

The World Cup was characterised by the vuvuzela's widespread and permanent use in the stands. In the specific context of South Africa, the vuvuzela adds a touch of local flavour and folklore, but UEFA feels that the instrument's widespread use would not be appropriate in Europe, where a continuous loud background noise would be emphasised.

The magic of football consists of the two-way exchange of emotions between the pitch and the stands, where the public can transmit a full range of feelings to the players. However, UEFA is of the view that the vuvuzelas would completely change the atmosphere, drowning supporter emotions and detracting from the experience of the game.

To avoid the risk of these negative effects in the stadiums where UEFA competitions are played and to protect the culture and tradition of football in Europe – singing, chanting etc. – UEFA has decided with immediate effect that vuvuzelas will not be allowed in the stadiums where UEFA competitions matches are played.

UEFA's associations have been instructed to take all necessary operational measures, and to instruct their clubs concerned to do the same in all UEFA club competitions in which they participate.