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Spain win #WU19EURO: at a glance

Spain retained the Women's U19 title with a 1-0 win against Germany: the story of their victory in Switzerland.

Spain win #WU19EURO: at a glance
Spain win #WU19EURO: at a glance ©Sportsfile

Winners: Spain
Runners-up: Germay
Semi-finals: Denmark/Norway

Top scorers
Olga Carmona (Spain) 2
Dajan Hashemi (Denmark) 2
Paulina Krumbiegel (Germany) 2
Alisha Lehmann (Switzerland) 2
Andrea Norheim (Norway) 2
Géraldine Reuteler (Switzerland) 2
Lynn Wilms (Netherlands) 2

Final highlights: Germany 0-1 Spain
Final highlights: Germany 0-1 Spain

Including qualifying
Fenna Kalma (Netherlands) 13
Amelie Delabre (France) 10
Andrea Stašková (Czech Republic) 9
Jutta Rantala (Finland) 8
Carla Bautista (Spain) 7
Agnese Bonfantini (Italy) 7
Sophie Haug (Norway) 7
Andrea Norheim (Norway) 7
Anna-Lena Stolze (Germany) 7

Semi-final highlights: Norway 0-2 Germany
Semi-final highlights: Norway 0-2 Germany

Records

  • Spain are the first nation win the Women's U17 and U19 titles in the same year.
  • Spain are the first nation other than Germany to retain the title (Germany did so in 2001, 2002 and 2007).
  • Spain became the first nation to reach five straight finals.
  • Germany equalled France's record of reaching nine finals.
  • Germany reached the last four for the 16th time in the 21 editions, three more than France.

Team of the tournament

Starting XI:
Goalkeeper

María Echezarreta (Spain & Oviedo Moderno)

Defenders
Anna Torrodá (Spain & Barcelona)
Sofie Svava (Denmark & Brøndby)
Lisa Ebert (Germany & FFC Frankfurt)
Vanessa Panzeri (Italy & Juventus)

Midfielders
Sydney Lohmann (Germany & Bayern München)
Rosa Marquez (Spain & Real Betis)
Sarah Jankovska (Denmark & BSF)
Géraldine Reuteler (Switzerland & Luzern)

Forwards
Olga Carmona (Spain & Sevilla)
Paulina Krumbiegel (Germany & Hoffenheim)

Substitutes:
Goalkeeper

Lene Christensen (Denmark & KoldingQ)

Defenders
Sara Holmgaard (Denmark & Fortuna Hjørring)
Joanna Bækkelund (Norway & Lyn)
Malin Gut (Switzerland & Zürich)

Midfielders
Marisa Olislagers (Netherlands & ADO Den Haag)
Teresa Abelleira (Spain & Deportivo La Coruña)
Benedetta Glionna (Italy & Fiammamonza Dilettante)

Forwards
Kelly Gago (France & St-Étienne)
Sophie Haug (Norway & LSK Kvinner)

Semi-final highlights: Denmark 0-1 Spain
Semi-final highlights: Denmark 0-1 Spain

Scotland 2019: qualifying round 28 August to 9 October 2018

All the results/highlights

Group stage

Wednesday 18 July
Group A
Spain 0-2 Norway: Wohlen
Switzerland 2-2 France: Wohlen – highlights
Group B
Germany 1-0 Denmark: Biel/Bienne
Netherlands 3-1 Italy: Biel/Bienne

Highlights: Switzerland 0-2 Spain
Highlights: Switzerland 0-2 Spain

Saturday 21 July
Group A
Norway 1-0 France: Zug
Switzerland 0-2 Spain: Zug – highlights
Group B
Denmark 1-0 Italy: Yverdon-les-Bains
Netherlands 1-0 Germany
: Yverdon-les-Bains

Highlights: Norway 1-3 Switzerland
Highlights: Norway 1-3 Switzerland

Tuesday 24 July
Group A
Norway 1-3 Switzerland: Wohlen – highlights
France 1-2 Spain: Zug
Group B
Denmark 3-1 Netherlands: Biel/Bienne
Italy 0-2 Germany: Yverdon-les-Bains

Knockout phase

See how Spain won the 2017 title
See how Spain won the 2017 title

Friday 27 July: Semi-finals
Norway 0-2 Germany: Biel/Bienne – highlights
Denmark 0-1 Spain: Biel/Bienne – highlights

Monday 30 July: Final
Germany 0-1 Spain: Biel/Bienne – highlights

Champions roll of honour

WU19 EURO (hosts)
2018: Spain (Switzerland)
2017: Spain (Northern Ireland)
2016: France (Slovakia)
2015: Sweden (Israel)
2014: Netherlands (Norway)
2013: France (Wales)
2012: Sweden (Turkey)
2011: Germany (Italy)
2010: France (FYR Macedonia)
2009: England (Belarus)
2008: Italy (France)
2007: Germany (Iceland)
2006: Germany (Switzerland)
2005: Russia (Hungary)
2004: Spain (Finland)
2003: France (Germany)
2002: Germany (Sweden)
WU18 EURO
2001: Germany (Norway)
2000: Germany (France)
1999: Sweden (Sweden)
1998: Denmark (two-legged final v France)

Titles:
Germany 6
France 4
Spain 3
Sweden 3
Denmark 1
England 1
Italy 1
Netherlands 1
Russia 1

Top-two finishes:
France 9
Germany
9
Spain 8
England 4
Norway 4
Sweden 4
Denmark 1
Italy 1
Netherlands 1

Top-four finishes:
Germany 16
France 13
Spain
9
Norway 8
Sweden 8
Denmark
6
England 6
Italy 4
Netherlands 4
Russia 3
Switzerland 3
Finland 2
Portugal 1
Republic of Ireland 1

(bold: inc 2018)

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