EURO 2020 final: when and where is it?

The UEFA EURO 2020 final will take place at Wembley Stadium in London.

The UEFA EURO 2020 final will take place at Wembley
The UEFA EURO 2020 final will take place at Wembley UEFA via Getty Images

UEFA EURO 2020 will be held across 12 host cities from 11 June 2021, but both semi-finals and the final will be held at Wembley Stadium in London.

When is the EURO 2020 final?

The UEFA EURO 2020 final takes place on Sunday 11 July 2021, kicking off at 21:00 CET. It was orginally scheduled for 12 July 2020 before the tournament was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Wembley will also host the semi-finals on Tuesday 6 and Wednesday 7 July.

Has Wembley staged a EURO final before?

Highlights: The best goals of EURO '96
Highlights: The best goals of EURO '96

The old Wembley Stadium – which was demolished in 2002 – hosted the EURO ‘96 decider. Germany were crowned European champions for a third time thanks to Oliver Bierhoff’s golden goal against the Czech Republic.

Thirty years prior to that, England’s 1966 FIFA World Cup triumph culminated at Wembley, the Three Lions beating West Germany 4-2 after extra time to lift the trophy on home soil.

In club competition, Manchester United (1968) and Liverpool (1978) have won two of the seven European Cup showpieces to have been held at the stadium. There have been two UEFA Champions League finals staged at Wembley since its reopening in 2007, with Barcelona prevailing in 2011 and Bayern triumphant two years later.

Where has the EURO final been held?

The final has previously been hosted by 13 different venues in 12 countries.

Watch goals from every EURO final: 1960-2016
Watch goals from every EURO final: 1960-2016

1960: Parc des Princes, Paris (France)
1964: Estadio Santiago Bernabéu, Madrid (Spain)
1968: Stadio Olimpico, Rome (Italy)
1972: Roi Baudouin, Brussels (Belgium)
1976: Stadion FK Crvena zvezda, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)
1980: Stadio Olimpico, Rome (Italy)
1984: Parc des Princes, Paris (France)
1988: Olympiastadion, Munich (Germany)
1992: Ullevi, Gothenburg (Sweden)
1996: Wembley Stadium, London (England)
2000: Feijenoord Stadium, Rotterdam (Netherlands)
2004: Estádio do Sport Lisboa e Benfica, Lisbon (Portugal)
2008: Ernst-Happel-Stadion, Vienna (Austria)
2012: NSK Olimpiyskyi, Kyiv (Ukraine)
2016: Stade de France, Saint-Denis (France)

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