EURO 1992 Team of the Tournament

Germany had the lion's share of players in the EURO' 92 best XI, Stefan Effenberg and Thomas Hässler among those making the grade.

Denmark goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel  celebrates  their extraordinary triumph at EURO ‘92
Denmark goalkeeper Peter Schmeichel celebrates their extraordinary triumph at EURO ‘92 Icon Sport via Getty Images

GOALKEEPER

Peter Schmeichel (Denmark)
One of the game’s great goalkeepers, who played in four EUROs on his way to a record 129 Denmark caps, first made his name at EURO '92. Impressive en route to the final, notably saving Marco van Basten's penalty in the semi-final shoot-out, here he surpassed himself with three world-class stops, two from Jürgen Klinsmann. The 1999 UEFA Champions League winner also won five Premier League titles and three FA Cups at Manchester United.

DEFENDERS

Jocelyn Angloma (France)
Although France were surprisingly eliminated in the group stage, the attack-minded full-back sparkled. A UEFA Champions League winner with Marseille a year later, Angloma left for Italy in 1994. Following a fabulous debut season with Torino, he went on to play for Inter and Valencia before ending his international career with France at EURO '96 on 37 caps. Guadeloupe-born Angloma has coached the Caribbean nation since 2017.

Laurent Blanc made the Team of the Tournament at three successive EUROs
Laurent Blanc made the Team of the Tournament at three successive EUROs©AFP

Laurent Blanc (France)
Made the team of the tournament in 1992, 1996 and 2000, where he bowed out with victory in the final – an honour cruelly denied him through suspension at the 1998 FIFA World Cup. Nicknamed ‘Le Président’ on account of his authority, elegance and leadership, the centre-back started at Montpellier as a midfielder, later representing Barcelona, Inter and Manchester United. Won the title as Bordeaux coach, led France at UEFA EURO 2012, then two domestic trebles with Paris.

Jürgen Kohler (Germany)
A brilliant man-marker, Kohler won the 1990 World Cup with West Germany and the UEFA Champions League with Dortmund in 1997. Domestic honours included three Bundesliga titles and a double with Juventus. The former Bayern defender, who earned 105 caps, won EURO '96 despite injury restricting him to 14 minutes in the tournament, though he made a much greater impact in the previous two UEFA European Championships.

Germany’s Jürgen Kohler in action during the EURO ‘92 final
Germany’s Jürgen Kohler in action during the EURO ‘92 final ©Getty Images

Andreas Brehme (Germany)
Brehme scored the winner in the 1990 World Cup final against Argentina and is regarded as one of the finest wing-backs to have graced the game, his 86 caps testifying to his status. His career began and ended at Kaiserslautern, sandwiching spells at Bayern and Inter – he won league titles with all three. Brehme was ever present in three successive UEFA European Championships.

MIDFIELDERS

Ruud Gullit (Netherlands)
Gullit was one of the continent's most illustrious players. European Footballer of the Year in 1987, the tall, dreadlocked total-footballer inspired Milan to the title and captained the Netherlands to their first major international trophy in 1988, scoring the opener in the final against the USSR with a powerful header. Equally commanding at EURO '92, he ended his international career with 66 caps and 17 goals in 1994. Has since coached Chelsea, Newcastle, Feyenoord, LA Galaxy and Terek Grozny.

Stefan Effenberg was the heartbeat of the Germany midfield at EURO ‘92
Stefan Effenberg was the heartbeat of the Germany midfield at EURO ‘92©Getty Images

Stefan Effenberg (Germany)
Effenberg had long since abandoned the international scene by the time he captained Bayern to 2001 UEFA Champions League success. His career as a German international effectively ended at the 1994 World Cup when he was sent home, though he returned briefly four years later. Five of his 35 caps came at EURO '92, where he scored his first international goal in the 2-0 win against Scotland. Won three successive Bundesliga titles in his second spell at Bayern and is currently sporting director at Uerdingen.

Thomas Hässler (Germany)
Twice West German Player of the Year, Hässler collected the second of those awards on the back of his performances at EURO '92. A World Cup winner two years earlier, the diminutive playmaker hit peak form in Sweden, propelling his team to the final and scoring fabulous free-kicks against the CIS and the hosts. Played for Juventus, Roma and four Bundesliga clubs, but shone brightest at international level, winning EURO '96 before ending his international career at UEFA EURO 2000 on 101 caps.

Brian Laudrup gets his hands on the trophy as Denmark stunned Europe in 1992
Brian Laudrup gets his hands on the trophy as Denmark stunned Europe in 1992©Getty Images

Brian Laudrup (Denmark)
Returned to the international scene in spring 1992 and was rewarded when Denmark belatedly gained access to the finals. Did not score in Sweden but was the most eye-catching Dane on show. Four years later, alongside his brother Michael, he had another strong EURO, scoring three goals, and excelled at the 1998 World Cup. Scored 21 goals in 82 internationals and won an Italian title and UEFA Champions League while at Milan in 1994.

Netherlands’ Dennis Bergkamp was joint-top scorer at EURO ‘92 alongside Henrik Larsen, Karl-Heinz Riedle and Thomas Brolin
Netherlands’ Dennis Bergkamp was joint-top scorer at EURO ‘92 alongside Henrik Larsen, Karl-Heinz Riedle and Thomas Brolin©Getty Images

FORWARDS

Dennis Bergkamp (Netherlands)
Already a winner of two European trophies with Ajax, Bergkamp scored four Oranje goals in qualifying and added three more at the finals to finish as the tournament's joint-top marksman. The skilful striker would appear in two further EUROs and two World Cups, scoring 37 goals in 79 games. Became an Arsenal legend following a move from Inter in 1995 and won numerous trophies, including two Premier League and FA Cup doubles, before retiring in 2006.

Marco van Basten (Netherlands)
Van Basten will always be remembered for his volley against the USSR in the EURO '88 final. It was his fifth goal of the tournament, following a hat-trick against England and a late semi-final winner against West Germany. Scooped the Golden Boot and would win the first of his three Ballon d'Or awards that year. At Milan he twice lifted the European Champion Clubs' Cup before an ankle injury forced his premature retirement after 24 goals from 58 caps. Coached his former club Ajax in 2008, after four years in charge of the Oranje.

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