UEFA.com works better on other browsers
For the best possible experience, we recommend using Chrome, Firefox or Microsoft Edge.

The greatest Champions League finals: which is your favourite?

The 2023 final is in Istanbul, scene of one of the all-time great UEFA Champions League deciders, but was Liverpool's success in 2005 really the best of them all?

Since the competition took on its current form in 1992/93, UEFA Champions League finals have produced plenty of drama, but which of the 29 games was the best of them all?

Which of the following finals is your pick?

Milan 4-0 Barcelona (1994) 

1994 final highlights: Milan 4-0 Barcelona

"This is perfection," said Milan boss Fabio Capello after his side completed the most emphatic final win in UEFA Champions League history. Johan Cruyff's Barcelona looked like favourites on paper ahead of the decider in Athens but were outplayed on the day, Daniele Massaro striking twice before the interval and Dejan Savićević and Marcel Desailly registering after the break. A one-sided encounter, but still quite the spectacle.

Man United 2-1 Bayern (1999)

1999 final highlights: Manchester United 2-1 Bayern

Alex Ferguson was not a man given to excessive displays of emotion, but even he was struck dumb after his side struck twice in added time to overturn a 1-0 deficit in Barcelona. "I haven't said anything to my players yet," he told reporters at full-time. "I've just hugged and kissed them. I've slobbered all over them." Substitutes Teddy Sheringham and Ole Gunnar Solskjær did the damage at the Camp Nou in perhaps the greatest late show of all.

Liverpool 3-3 aet Milan (2005, Liverpool win 3-2 on pens)

2005 final highlights: Liverpool 3-3 Milan (3-2 pens)

"There were no wild celebrations afterwards," remembered Liverpool midfielder Dietmar Hamann of the aftermath of the 'Miracle of Istanbul'. "It was more disbelief." The ultimate game of two halves started with the Reds chasing shadows as a Kaká-powered Milan took a 3-0 lead but, helped by Hamann's half-time introduction, they levelled matters on the night with three goals in the space of eight minutes after the break then won the game 3-2 on penalties.

Man United 1-1 aet Chelsea (2008, Man United win 6-5 on pens)

2008 final highlights: Manchester United 1-1 Chelsea (6-5 pens)

"I played well in the game, scored a goal, and then missed the penalty [in the shoot-out]," remembered Cristiano Ronaldo of the 2008 final in Moscow. "It would have been the worst day of my life." 'CR7' put the Red Devils in front in the first all-English final, only for Frank Lampard to level before the break. Ronaldo failed to convert his penalty, but John Terry's miss cancelled it out, United going on to prevail 6-5 in sudden death.

Barcelona 2-0 Man. United (2009)

2009 final highlights: Barcelona 2-0 Manchester United

There was a sense of a baton being passed on as Josep Guardiola's Barcelona overwhelmed the reigning champions in Rome, goals from Samuel Eto'o and Lionel Messi proving decisive. Their tiki-taka style had already netted them the Liga and Spanish Cup, midfielder Andrés Iniesta explaining: "It was the first treble [a Spanish club had won]. It's something really unique, magical and something you will always remember."

Chelsea 1-1 aet Bayern (2012, Chelsea win 4-3 on pens)

2012 final highlights: Chelsea 1-1 Bayern (4-3 pens)

Thomas Müller's goal seven minutes from time looked to have earned a deserved victory for Bayern in a final played at their own stadium, but Didier Drogba replied, and Petr Čech then saved an extra-time penalty from former team-mate Arjen Robben to set Chelsea up for a 4-3 success in the shoot-out. "It was fate," said Drogba, who had been sent off in his side's 2008 final loss. "I believe a lot in destiny. It was written a long time ago but we did not know."

Real Madrid 4-1 aet Atlético (2014)

2014 final highlights: Real Madrid 4-1 Atlético

 Bayern had the trophy whipped from under their noses with late goals in the 1999 and 2012 deciders, and it was Atlético's turn to suffer in 2014 in this high-profile derby. Diego Simeone's side led through Diego Godín's first-half finish, but Sergio Ramos headed Madrid level at the death, Gareth Bale, Marcelo and Ronaldo compounding the misery with goals in extra time. "That happiness will stay with me forever," Ramos recalled later.